True Grave Of First African-American Soldier Buried At Chattanooga Confederate Cemetery Found

Wednesday, March 23, 2016
The true grave of Shaderick Searcy was uncovered at the Chattanooga Confederate Cemetery
The true grave of Shaderick Searcy was uncovered at the Chattanooga Confederate Cemetery

SHADERICK SEARCY, 1846-1937: PRIVATE C.S.A.

Shaderick Searcy was a black Confederate soldier. He was a bonded servant of Dr. John Searcy of Talbotton, Ga. When the Civil War began, Dr. Searcy, knowing that both his sons James and Kitchen would go off to war, dedicated Shaderick to become body servant to his two boys. 

Both Dr. Searcy’s sons of Company I of the 46th Georgia Infantry were killed during this conflict. James was killed at bloody Franklin, Tenn. and Kitchen was killed at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain near Atlanta.  

Shaderick outlived both his wards and survived the Civil War. He received a pension for his Confederate service and died at the age of 91 in Chattanooga. 

It has been long known and accepted that Shaderick was the first African-American to be buried in Chattanooga’s Confederate Cemetery. The only evidence that Shaderick was located there was a simple headstone, but it was also recognized that this was only a marker and not the grave site.  

During the second week of March, 2016 while restoration of the cemetery was ongoing, the true headstone and final resting place of Shaderick Searcy was discovered.  

"Now as Sons of Confederate Veterans we too can honor the memory and the service of this Confederate soldier," said John A. Campbell, N.B. Forrest Camp 3, Sons of Confederate Veterans. 




Bradfields Were Early Settlers At Dallas

John Bradfield was a pioneer circuit-riding minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a justice of the peace in the county's early days and was one of the organizers of Jackson's Chapel at Hixson. Bradfield was born Jan. 12, 1791, in Prince William County, Va. That year, John Hooe rented 200 acres to Moses Davis that was "now occupied by Zachariah ... (click for more)

Reese Brabson Was Among Stump Speakers In Chattanooga's Early Days

Reese Bowen Brabson was "a character - portly, jovial, lawyer, politician. He was an orator and scholar - polished and elegant.'' Whenever the Whigs wanted a Democrat denounced, they could count on red-headed Reese Brabson to mount the stump and do so. Like Col. Rush Montgomery, Reese Brabson predicted a great future for the city that had recently switched from ... (click for more)

Signal Facing Decisions On Expanding Commercial Area Past Albert Road, Mountain Community Center And Water Service

The design review committee (DRC) of the town of Signal Mountain is in the process of establishing standards for commercial buildings. In the meantime, developer Bob Elliott would like to buy property at the corner of Taft Highway and Albert Road. Albert Road has traditionally been where the commercial property ends. A number of residents in the neighborhood around that area are ... (click for more)

Initiative Launches In Support Of Signal Mountain’s Water System; Tennessee-American Says It Has Long Provided Clean Water To Signal

A citizen committee is urging Signal Mountain "to be vocal and choose local" in the imminent water department sale. The local group formed “Be Vocal. Choose Local.” after the town of Signal Mountain voted last May to initiate a Request for Proposals for the acquisition of its water department.  The committee urges the town to sell its water system to Walden’s Ridge Utility ... (click for more)

Legislators: Protect Our Students And Teachers

When students step into their classrooms, they are there to learn and prepare for their future. Our teachers serve to advance each student’s education and guide them towards success.  Educators have an additional responsibility: maintaining the trust and respect of their students by conducting themselves professionally and responsibly. The vast majority of our ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The Saturday Funnies

Every day, without exception, I find a number of “treats” in my daily dose of email. These funnies, and other pertinent information, are sent to me by a myriad of “Internet Buddies” who I repay by sending out some of the funniest that I collect. Think of it as sort of a “co-op” for my readers to enjoy. When The Saturday Funnies began last summer, it was what I still think is ... (click for more)