Local Team Publishes Children's Zombie Book

Monday, November 19, 2012


A Brain is For Eating is a book for zombie children that teaches the little walking undead how to find their next meal: brains. The book is being locally published via Kickstarter where fans can purchase a print or digital copy of the book before the campaign expires on Sunday.  

The book is the brainchild of husband and wife team Daniel and Amelia Jacobs, who penned the tale on a bicycle trip across Europe. "We had a lot of fun imaging a post-apocalyptic world from a zombie child's perspective,” says Mr. Jacobs. "Of course, it's really written more for human adults, but I'm sure there are some non-zombie kids out there who can appreciate the macabre silliness of the story."  

The illustrations are the work of Scott Brundage whose drawings regularly appear in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Scientific American. Mr. Brundage also admits that the subject is dark, but places it in context. It's part of a long tradition of dark humorists, like Edward Gorey, and the fully imagined worlds of children with an adult sense of irony, like Bill Watterson's Calvin.  

Mr. Brundage constructed the world from the viewpoint of a young zombie. “Humans and environments are very much secondary to the all-important undead protagonists," says Mr. Brundage wryly. “People, obviously, are just packaging for food.” 

The book is being published and produced by Pale Dot Voyage, a digital bakery that specializes in design, marketing and mobile development. The company partners with entrepreneurs and artists to build and launch ideas on the web and to the world.

The project was shared last week with a local group at the innovators event "Will This Float?" along with lots of other projects from Pale Dot Voyage.


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