Waterfowl, Migratory Bird Hunting Proposals Made During TFWC 1st Meeting In 2018

Friday, January 19, 2018

A preview of the 2018-19 waterfowl and other migratory bird hunting seasons was presented at the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission’s first meeting of the year. The two-day meeting concluded Friday at the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s Region II Ray Bell Building.

Jamie Feddersen, TWRA’s Migratory Game Bird Program leader, gave the preview. Seasons and bag limits for most migratory gamebirds will be similar to 2017-18.

Proposed changes include the increase of the daily bag limit for pintails and black ducks from one bird a day to two birds a day.

Another proposed change is in regard to the youth waterfowl hunts which occur on consecutive Saturdays in February. The hunts have been for youth ages 6 to 15, but the agency is proposing a change for youth from ages 6 to 16 to fall in line with other TWRA youth hunts such as deer and turkey.  Federal regulations were recently changed to include youth to age 16.

Youth hunters must be accompanied by a non-hunting adult, age 21 or older. Also proposed is, adults and other persons accompanying youth hunters shall not hunt during these youth waterfowl hunts.

The proposal includes an expansion for most goose seasons to include more days. The bag limit of white-fronted geese would increase from two birds a day to three a day.

The statewide sandhill crane hunting season will remain the same with only a change in calendar dates.

Frank Fiss, Fisheries Division chief, followed his presentation that he gave in December with an update on Asian carp. He discussed the agency’s exploring the possibilities of controlling the invasive species, including working with commercial fishermen. 

Doug Markham, TWRA Communications manager, also updated the commission on the agency’s continued efforts to educate the public about chronic wasting disease (CWD). Tennessee has not had any documented cases of the disease which could be devastating to deer and elk populations. Efforts  include informing hunters who travel out of state about Tennessee’s carcass import restrictions.

Three surrounding states, Arkansas, Missouri, and Virginia, have reported cases of CWD in deer or elk herds. They are among the states where Tennessee’s important restrictions apply.

Ducks Unlimited/Canada representative Dave Kostersky, discussed the 2017 highlights and the organizations continued partnership with the TWRA. He was joined by the DU/Canada Chairman Jim Couch and they presented plaques of appreciation to commission members for continued support of the organization.

Several awards were presented at this month’s meeting. Mark Gudlin, TWRA Wildlife and Forestry Division chief, announced the wildlife biologist and wildlife technician of the year. Dan Gibbs, from TWRA Region IV, was the biologist winner and Josh Roberson, TWRA Region I, was named the technician award winner.

David Hanni, TWRA’s State Bird Conservation coordinator, introduced the second winner of the Robert M. Hatcher Ornithological Scholarship. Mackenzie Roeder, a graduate student at Austin Peay, was at the meeting to receive her award. The $1,000 scholarship is named in honor of Bob Hatcher, who served the TWRA for 38 years ending his career as the Non-Game and Endangered Species coordinator from 1987 until 2001. 


green|spaces Initiates Straw Take Over Events For Skip The Straw Campaign

green|spaces is hosting three Straw Take Over events as a part of their “Skip the Straw” campaign, an effort to "the number of plastic straws that pollute the environment." The first Straw Take Over will be Oct. 19 at Bluegrass Grill from 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., followed by the second Straw Take Over on Oct. 25 at Niedlov's Breadworks from 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.  The Straw Take ... (click for more)

October TFWC Meeting Changed To 1 Day

The October meeting of the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission has been changed to a one day meeting. It will be held Thursday, Oct. 25 beginning at 1 p.m. at the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s Region II Ray Bell Building in the Ellington Agricultural Center. In addition to the regular TFWC meeting, the Retention and Recruitment Committee will meet at 10 a.m. The committee ... (click for more)

County Schools To Push Forward With Equity Effort; Magnet Schools To Get More Diversity With Lottery Change

The county schools will push forward with an equity effort that appeared to have been paused after board members Rhonda Thurman and Joe Smith in May said  they rejected the idea that county schools need to “racially and economically integrate.” An equity task force did not meet for several months and the schools did not move forward on hiring an outside consultant to help ... (click for more)

Chattanooga Red Wolves SC To Build Soccer-Specific Stadium For 2020 Season

Chattanooga Red Wolves Soccer Club is building a state-of-the-art, soccer-specific facility, where the team will host home games beginning in 2020. For its inaugural season, the club will play at Chattanooga Christian School’s David Stanton Field in 2019.   David Stanton Field seats 3,500, and the club plans to install additional temporary seating allowing up to approximately ... (click for more)

Drink Up, Chattanooga

I attended the meeting to discuss the placement of the sewage treatment plant at the Cambridge Center in Ooltewah today. My problem with the meeting (aka) dog and pony show, is that the meeting started out with the agenda of the Ooltewah Community Council.  After living in this area for 45+ years I have never heard of this group.  I would like for someone to answer ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Dear Faux Pelini

It has been my experience that of all the tribes and herds of different people on earth, sports writers are among the funniest people of all. Oh, there isn’t anything real sexy about Villanova beating Georgetown or a baseball player hitting for the cycle. Now, if a player hits a single, double, triple and homer in that order, that’s “a natural cycle,” and that is kind of fun to ... (click for more)