Tennessee Library & Archives Hosts Free Workshop on Andrew Jackson

Tuesday, March 7, 2017
The Hermitage, home of President Andrew Jackson
The Hermitage, home of President Andrew Jackson

Born 250 years ago this month, Andrew Jackson remains one of Tennessee's most iconic and controversial political figures. The former United States president is celebrated for his popularity with common folk and his military skills, but reviled for his headstrong temperament and his troubling relations with Native Americans.

To commemorate his birthday, the Tennessee State Library & Archives will soon be launching a new online exhibit highlighting documents from Jackson's life and career. On April 1, the two Library & Archives staff members who curated the exhibit will host a free workshop.

The workshop, titled "Andrew Jackson and his Legacy," will run from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. on that day in the auditorium of the Library & Archives building, which is located at 403 7th Ave. North in downtown Nashville.

"Andrew Jackson is one of Tennessee's most important historical figures so it is very helpful for researchers to have more information about him available online," Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. "This presentation will be a useful primer on the materials that will be included in the Tennessee Virtual Archive exhibit."

Assistant State Archivist Wayne Moore and Archival Assistant Zachary Keith will talk about the collections of Jackson's papers available at the Library & Archives, which include a version of the only known photograph of Jackson, personal letters, original maps from the War of 1812, political cartoons, campaign broadsides, engravings and lithographs. The Library & Archives also has papers from some of Jackson's chief associates, including John Overton, John Coffee, James Winchester, William Carroll and William B. Lewis.

During their presentation, Moore and Keith will discuss topics ranging from Jackson's family life with his wife Rachel and their adopted children, to Jackson's duels with rivals, to his management of his plantation and his military and political exploits.

Although the event is free and open to the public, reservations are required because of seating limitations in the Library & Archives auditorium. To register for the event, please use this online link: https://andrewjackson250.eventbrite.com

The Library & Archives building is located directly west of the Tennessee State Capitol building. Free parking is available around the building on Saturdays.




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