Georgia Northwestern Technical College And Georgia Military College Sign Articulation Agreement

Wednesday, February 15, 2017
Pete McDonald (left), president of GNTC, and Dr. Mike Holmes (right), senior vice president, chief academic officer, and dean of faculty at GMC sign an articulation agreement at GNTC’s Floyd County Campus in Rome.
Pete McDonald (left), president of GNTC, and Dr. Mike Holmes (right), senior vice president, chief academic officer, and dean of faculty at GMC sign an articulation agreement at GNTC’s Floyd County Campus in Rome.

Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC) and Georgia Military College (GMC) held an articulation agreement signing ceremony on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at the Floyd County Campus in Rome.

The goal of the articulation agreement is to provide Associate of Applied Science (AAS) graduates of select Georgia Northwestern Technical College programs with an opportunity to continue with Georgia Military College to earn a Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) degree. Under the agreement, any GNTC student graduating with their AAS degree and having at least 24 semester hours (36 quarter hours) of technical/occupational credit accepted as transfer credit by GMC, is guaranteed admission into one of GMC’s BAS degree programs in Business Management or Supervision and Management. 

“Georgia Northwestern Technical College is very pleased to enter into an articulation agreement with Georgia Military College to offer our students a pathway to earn a Bachelor of Applied Science degree,” said Pete McDonald, president of GNTC. “As an institution of higher learning GNTC recognizes the on-going need for continuous education throughout one’s career. This collaborative agreement will open many career options for our GNTC students after achieving their Associate of Applied Science degrees.”

“The ever increasing partnership between the institutions of higher education in Georgia will advance the workforce of our state and region. Under the leadership of Gov. Nathan Deal, Georgia has been recognized as the Number One state in the United States for doing business. By institutions working together, Georgia will continue to be the Number One place for business expansion and job creation,” continued McDonald.

This agreement formally recognizes that Georgia Northwestern Technical College and Georgia Military College are committed to the establishment of an educational partnership to better serve currently enrolled and future students at both institutions, as well as, support economic and workforce development in the communities served by these educational institutions.

“We are thrilled to launch this partnership with Georgia Northwestern Technical College to serve the students of Georgia,” said Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV, president of Georgia Military College. “Our BAS degrees are designed to build upon the occupational/technical education provided by an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree program and provide an excellent pathway toward completion of a bachelor degree. Our BAS degree programs prepare students for career advancement opportunities and management and supervisory roles in their technical or occupational field. This partnership with GNTC is another step in providing greater opportunities and a brighter future for the citizens of Georgia and is consistent with Gov. Nathan Deal’s Complete College Georgia initiative designed to provide an improved educational pipeline from high school through college graduation.”


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