Constitution Week Events

Thursday, September 12, 2013
Judge Neil Thomas, III and Linda Moss Mines
Judge Neil Thomas, III and Linda Moss Mines

The United States Constitution, written in 1787, signed by the delegates on Sept. 17, ratified in 1788, and in operation since 1789, is now the world's longest surviving written charter of government. Its first three words –– "We the People" –– affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens.

In 1956, the United States Congress declared Sept. 17 as Constitution Day and years later, Congress added a requirement that all schools and government offices provide community educational programs as a part of Constitution Week.

Citizens are invited to all area events.   Among the local events planned are:

Monday, 6-7 p.m., Hamilton County Courthouse

Judge Neil Thomas, III and Linda Moss Mines, GPS History Department chair and Chattanooga-Hamilton County historian, will lead the first of four planned  'Constitutional Issues' seminars.  The first seminar, Contempt of Court, examines the 1906 Ed Johnson case and takes its title from the acclaimed book by the late Chattanooga attorney Leroy Phillips and Dallas Morning News legal affairs writer, Mark Curriden. The Johnson case was the first criminal case heard on appeal by the United States Supreme Court. Join Judge Thomas and Ms. Mines as they plumb the issues surrounding this high profile case. 

Tuesday, noon, Hamilton County Courthouse 

Join County Mayor Jim Coppinger, Hamilton County Commission members and local citizens as they "ring the bells" celebrating constitutionally-guaranteed freedoms.  Mayor Coppinger will speak briefly on the significance of the federal system and the benefits of national, state and local governments functioning in a balance of power and responsibility. Bring a bell. 

Thursday, Sept. 19, 4-4:30 p.m., Chattanooga City Hall

Join students from local schools as they read aloud the Preamble to the U S Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  You could be in for a treat if they decide to "Schoolhouse Rock" the Preamble. Students will assemble on the 11th Street steps of City Hall.

For more information about Constitution Week programs, email Jessica Dumitru [jmdumitru@gmail.com], Tennessee Constitution Week Chairman, Daughters of the American Revolution.


Celebration Of Human Rights Day Is Dec. 10

The United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on Dec. 10, 1948. It represents the universal recognition that basic rights and fundamental freedoms are inherent to all human beings, inalienable and equally applicable to everyone, and that every one of us is born free and equal in dignity and rights. The community is invited to come to the Eastdale Village ... (click for more)

Chattanooga International Human Rights Day 2016 Commemoration To Be Held Dec. 10

The Chattanooga Human Rights Day Committee, in conjunction with the Tennessee Human Rights Commission, will host the Chattanooga International Human Rights Day 2016 Commemoration, on  Saturday, Dec. 10, at 10 a.m. , at the Eastdale Village UMC Church. For more details, call  423 320-8598 . (click for more)

East Ridge Meth Dealer Gets 168 Months In Federal Prison

A man who agents said was dealing large quantities of meth from his East Ridge residence has been sentenced to serve 168 months in federal prison. Kenneth Lemons appeared before Judge Curtis Collier. Agents said they made several controlled drug buys from Lemons at his residence in 2015. On Oct. 27, 2015, he drove up to a residence where DEA agents were making a controlled ... (click for more)

Chattanooga Man With 5 Violent Felonies Gets 30 Years In Prison

A Chattanooga man with five violent felonies on his record has been sentenced to serve 30 years in prison. Demetrius Joiner, 30, was given a 20-year sentence by Judge Curtis Collier after he was ruled to be an Armed Career Criminal. Judge Collier said the term would be consecutive to several state sentences imposed earlier on Joiner, including 10 years for aggravated robbery. ... (click for more)

Signal Mountain Couldn't Manage Public Education

I have been reading the buzz about Signal Mountain and other small municipalities considering a move to form their own school district within their municipal boundaries.  It is quite the comedy hour considering the notion that small cities that for decades could not even manage small sewer systems or 911 districts, are somehow going to do a better job with public education ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: School Board Can’t Wait

It took the Hamilton County School board nine months before the group hired a search firm to find a new superintendent. But you mark my words – the Department of Education will undoubtedly implode if our leaders wait another nine months simply hoping for some type of mystical salvation. In the last week Signal Mountain leaders have all but given notice they will form their own district ... (click for more)