Genealogy Workshop for African Americans and Native Americans July 21

Friday, July 19, 2013
Gigi Best
Gigi Best

Ever wondered about your family’s role in our history?  Did you listen with interest to the stories told around your grandparents’ dinner table and try to imagine who those people were and what their lives were like?  Do you now wish you had listened more closely? Then mark your calendar for Sunday evening, July 21, 7:30-8:30 pm at the Bessie Smith Cultural Hall!  Answers await you.

UNTANGLING TANGLED WEBS, a workshop sponsored jointly by the Chief John Ross Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Bessie Smith Cultural Hall, the Chattanooga Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Hamilton County Historian, will help you find the answers to your genealogical questions.  Specifically designed for African American and Native American researchers, the genealogical techniques offered will assist any researcher.  Workshop packets will be provided for all participants.

Workshop presenter, GiGi Best of Tampa, Florida, is a member of several national genealogical societies including the Daughters of the American Revolution, the National Society of Colonial Dames and the Sons and Daughters of Pilgrims.  Having proved her ancestry back to 1602, Ms. Best shares her experiences in African American, Native American and European family history research.  She will help each participant understand the use of traditional source materials and cutting-edge DNA technology.

For more information, email lsmines@gps.edu or call 423-499-0892 or 423-413-3743.



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