Genealogy Workshop for African Americans and Native Americans July 21

Friday, July 19, 2013
Gigi Best
Gigi Best

Ever wondered about your family’s role in our history?  Did you listen with interest to the stories told around your grandparents’ dinner table and try to imagine who those people were and what their lives were like?  Do you now wish you had listened more closely? Then mark your calendar for Sunday evening, July 21, 7:30-8:30 pm at the Bessie Smith Cultural Hall!  Answers await you.

UNTANGLING TANGLED WEBS, a workshop sponsored jointly by the Chief John Ross Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Bessie Smith Cultural Hall, the Chattanooga Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Hamilton County Historian, will help you find the answers to your genealogical questions.  Specifically designed for African American and Native American researchers, the genealogical techniques offered will assist any researcher.  Workshop packets will be provided for all participants.

Workshop presenter, GiGi Best of Tampa, Florida, is a member of several national genealogical societies including the Daughters of the American Revolution, the National Society of Colonial Dames and the Sons and Daughters of Pilgrims.  Having proved her ancestry back to 1602, Ms. Best shares her experiences in African American, Native American and European family history research.  She will help each participant understand the use of traditional source materials and cutting-edge DNA technology.

For more information, email lsmines@gps.edu or call 423-499-0892 or 423-413-3743.


First Thanksgiving in Chattanooga (Civil War)

By “first Thanksgiving Day”, no, I do not mean the harvest thanksgiving meal which the Separatist colonists of New Plymouth shared uncomfortably with their Wampanoag neighbors.   Nor do I mean any of the thanksgivings proclaimed on a one-time basis by a U.S. President after that.   In this case, the “First Thanksgiving Day” means the inaugural event of those that have ... (click for more)

Chester Martin Remembers Larry V. Myers And His Explorer Scouts

I can't believe that it has been over 40 years since Larry Myers of the Chattanooga Fire Department was active here in Chattanooga. He was a very well-known professional fireman   who also took great interest in our local youth, organizing some of them into a group of re-enactors. I was fortunate to see them in action, especially at Fort Loudoun, where their authentic ... (click for more)

Curtis Coleman Sentenced To 144 Months For Dealing Heroin

Curtis Allen Coleman, 41, of Dayton, Ohio, was sentenced to serve 144 months in prison by Federal Judge Travis R. McDonough for heroin distribution in Chattanooga. Coleman pleaded guilty in August to a federal indictment charging him with, among other things, conspiracy to distribute heroin.  According to information on file with the United States District ... (click for more)

Red Cross Continues Tornado Relief In Southeast Tennessee

After tornadoes and strong straight-line winds moved through Southeast Tennessee on Tuesday evening, Red Cross mobilized more than 70 volunteers, provided shelter for displaced residents, and is working to ensure that emergency needs are being met for everyone who was affected.   “We are working very closely with our local Emergency Management Agencies and community partners ... (click for more)

Tennessee River Gorge Trust Trail Warriors Make You Want To Take A Hike

Trail warriors of the Tennessee River Gorge Trust make you want to take a hike.  The Tennessee River Gorge Trust staff and volunteers make a huge difference in the Chattanooga community and have been making the outdoor areas around the River Gorge clean and protected for more than 30 years.  They deserve to be recognized and praised for all of the hard work they have ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Why Our Schools Stink

Cheryl Roddy has spent her lifetime, for the biggest part, as a teacher for the Hamilton County Department of Education and, more specifically, at East Ridge High School. She has loved teaching there for nearly 40 years and is hardly “average;” she has her master's degree in education, was twice East Ridge’s teacher of the year, was the first teacher at East Ridge to reach the first ... (click for more)