PBS Debuts New Season Of Locally Produced Programs Thursday

WTCI Celebrates 21st Season Of Southern Accents

Wednesday, February 6, 2013
Karen Elliott
Karen Elliott

WTCI-PBS, the Tennessee Valley’s PBS station, will debut the 21st season of Southern Accents on Thursday at 8 p.m.

Southern Accents is one of the most popular programs on WTCI-PBS and is the longest running locally produced show at the station.  Featuring interesting places to visit and fun things to do throughout the south, this Emmy-nominated program currently airs on the Tennessee Channel and has aired statewide in Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, West Virginia and New Jersey, as well as in other cities throughout the country.

Previous episodes can watched online at www.wtcitv.org/southernaccents and this season host Karen Elliott will take her audience to "fascinating southern sites."  Ms. Elliott and her audience will celebrate Black History Month on Thursday by visiting the Alex Haley Museum and Interpretive Center, the Troy University Rosa Parks Museum, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Tour and the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. 

During February producer and host Ms. Elliott will also visit The Incline Railway, the Alabama Gold Camp, Pincu Pottery, Miss Patti’s 1880 Settlement and enjoy a special episode on Thursday, Feb. 21 from Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Ga.  Ms. Elliott has hosted the show for 15 years and she says, “Our goal is to encourage viewers to get out and explore the wonderful places and people that make the south unique.”

Encore presentations of Southern Accents can be seen on Saturday at 5:30 p.m. and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. on WTCI-PBS. 

"WTCI is committed to offering unique local programming because, as a PBS station, our connection within the community is what makes us different and vital to the members who support us," said Paul Grove, president and CEO of WTCI-PBS.


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