Siskin Children’s Institute’s Developmental Pediatric Center Adds 2nd Pediatrician To Serve Growing Need For Services

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

The Siskin Center for Developmental Pediatrics (SCDP) announced the addition of developmental behavioral pediatrician, Michael Cupoli, M.D., FAAP to its staff.

The center welcomes Dr. Cupoli at a time when the need for access to developmental pediatric subspecialty services is exceptionally high on a local and national level. According to Regina Gargus, M.D., FAAP, board certified developmental behavioral pediatrician and medical director of the SCDP, “Early identification of developmental disorders is needed for best long-term outcome. The addition of Dr. Cupoli to our center will significantly reduce the time a child will wait to receive services. We are focusing our efforts to continue to expand developmental pediatric care for children in our region.”

Dr. Cupoli joins the institute with more than four decades of experience in the field of pediatrics and child development. He earned his undergraduate degree from Boston College and his doctorate from Georgetown Medical School. He completed his residency at the University of Colorado Medical Center and a fellowship in medicine/child development at the Harvard Medical School. In 1973 Dr. Cupoli entered active duty in the U.S. Air Force, serving as pediatrician-in-chief on bases in Germany and Florida.

Most recently, Dr. Cupoli worked as medical director for the Pediatric Developmental Center at the Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, for the Division of Child Development and Behavior, and for the Down Syndrome Clinic at Lutheran General Children’s Hospital in Chicago. Dr. Cupoli served as medical director for Children’s Medical Services (the state of Florida’s program for children with special needs). In this role he was the first director of the Florida Early Intervention Program. 

“I’m very excited to come to Tennessee and join Siskin Children’s Institute,” said Dr. Cupoli. The Institute’s history of working on behalf of children with special needs is amazing. It’s a wonderful organization with a warm and caring atmosphere. I’m proud to be a part of it.”

John Farrimond, president and CEO of Siskin Children’s Institute, said, “Dr. Cupoli is an outstanding addition to the developmental pediatric center. His many years of experience and his obvious dedication to young people and their families strengthen our team and expand our capabilities. I’m delighted to have him on-board.”

In 2012 the pediatric center implemented strategic changes to improve its services, including a new patient portal, electronic health record, a scheduling and billing system and electronic prescribing, including online medication refills. The center also began recruitment of additional care providers, including Cupoli, a second nurse practitioner, a licensed practical nurse (LPN) and other medical, therapy and administrative staff. The Institute will welcome Emily Brandt, M.D., a third developmental pediatrician, to the practice by August 2013. 

Since the center’s doors opened in 2009, it has served children through more than 18,000 developmental visits. The center has cared for children and families from more than 145 communities regionally, nationally and internationally. The center accepts referrals from primary and subspecialty pediatric care physicians, offering assessment and diagnosis for a wide range of developmental conditions. Once in the program, children can receive treatment and support up to 21 years of age.

The vision of the center is to deliver healthcare access to multi-specialty services for comprehensive assessment, diagnosis and family centered treatment, optimizing potentials and long-term developmental outcomes in infants and children.

For more information on the Siskin Center for Developmental Pediatrics, contact Lois Kohrt, administrative director of the center, at 423 490-7710 or visit www.siskin.org/pediatrics.

   


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