Chattanooga Area Historical Association Annual Meeting Saturday, February 2

Thursday, January 10, 2013

 

CHATTANOOGA AREA HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING

The annual meeting of the Chattanooga Area Historical Association will be held Saturday, February 2 beginning at 11:15am at the Chattanooga Choo-Choo's Imperial Ballroom. 

Program of Events

11:15 am Lunch ($23.00 per person)

12:00 pm Business Meeting

1:00 pm Address (Free and Open to the Public)

"Civil War Soldiers and the Image of East Tennessee," Dr. Earl J.

Hess, Stewart W. McClelland Chair in History, Lincoln Memorial University

Dr. Earl J. Hess grew up in rural Missouri. He completed his B.A. and M.A. degrees in History at Southeast Missouri State University. His Ph.D. in American Studies, with a concentration in History, was awarded by Purdue University in 1986. He has taught at a number of institutions, including the University of Georgia, Texas Tech University, and the University of Arkansas. Since 1989, he has been at Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, where he is Associate Professor of History, past director of the History Program, and holds the Stewart W. McClelland Chair. Dr. Hess has published nearly twenty books, more than twenty articles, and over 100 book reviews.

If you would like more information about this event, please contact Scott Seagle at 423/364-3169 or email at seaglehomes@comcast.net. Dr. Hess’ address is presented by The Library of America in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.


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