New Book Available About St. Elmo By Jeffrey Webb

Friday, December 7, 2012

A new book is now available on historic St. Elmo.

It was written by Jeffrey Webb, who lives at 4310 St. Elmo Ave.

He said, "After many years of research I finally decided to write a book about St. Elmo's history and its founders. The book comes from a long time love of St. Elmo and I am really proud of the finished product.

"The book covers the Whiteside and Johnson families as well as St. Elmo's industrial leaders. Also covered are the schools of ST Elmo, businesses and St. Elmo residents. I have included more than 100 pictures from the past to the present. The book is 8.5 x 11 with full color front and rear cover (Incline Railway 1930's and 1970's) and is professionally printed and bound.

"The Book titled St. Elmo, Yesterday and Today "The Story of a Community" can be purchased from me directly by sending cash, check or money order for $15 to

Jeffrey Webb

4310 St. Elmo Avenue

Chattanooga, TN. 37409

$15.00 book price plus Free Shipping anywhere in USA

"The book can be purchased at my home for $15.00 and I will deliver them if needed. Call Jeff 423-825-1281

"I can also except payment through Paypal and the book can be purchased on eBay or

"It can be purchased from www.thebookpatch.com by clicking the Buy Now Button above. The price is $15.99 plus S/H and should be available in in 2 days,

"It can also be purchased from www.hctgs.org

"St. Elmo Yesterday and Today (The Story of a Community) is a limited edition and will never be reprinted."


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