Bright School Receives Science Grant

Saturday, December 15, 2012
Bright School’s fourth graders Jackson Standefer, Hunter McVay and Lili Siyam explore the outdoor pond area.
Bright School’s fourth graders Jackson Standefer, Hunter McVay and Lili Siyam explore the outdoor pond area.

The Bright School was awarded a grant from the Jewell Foundation to help fund the renovation of an outdoor pond area.  The school’s science teacher and her assistant lead small groups of students in daily in exciting and engaging activities related to the study of the world around us.  The grant for the natural pond and its ecosystems allows for the enhancement of an existing pond located outside the science laboratory, including the construction of an earthen wall which defines layers of strata revealing artifacts relating to the local history of this area.  Also, a waterfall gives way gradually to a bog where students can explore a variety of ecosystems, learning more about soil, water, flora and fauna.  The study of life science, physical science and earth science will lead the children to greater comprehension of the impact these disciplines have on their everyday lives.


“We are grateful to the Jewell Foundation for supporting our approaches to teaching science,” said Kitty McMillan, science teacher.  “As my students learn to appreciate and love nature, they also learn to become responsible custodians of their environment. The protection of nature benefits all of us.”


Founded in 1913, Bright School is a coeducational, independent elementary school serving children in ages three through grade five.  The school is located on Hixson Pike in North Chattanooga.  For more information, call 267-8546.



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