Harrison Bay State Park To Host Holiday At The Bay On Sunday

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

The year 2012 marks Tennessee State Parks’ 75th Anniversary, and to help commemorate this important milestone, Harrison Bay State Park will host Holiday at the Bay on Sunday, from 6-10 p.m.

Celebrating the spirit of Christmas and wintertime fun, along with 75 years of state parks, visitors can enjoy old-time games, a historical timeline of Harrison Bay, ranger programs, an indoor snowball fight, chestnuts roasting over an open fire, a chili and dessert contest, and hot chocolate and cider.

“We are very excited to celebrate Tennessee State Parks’ 75th Anniversary this year,” said Park Manager Don Campbell.  "Holiday at the Bay is a great event to learn about the history of the area, while heralding in the holidays.”

Also making an appearance will be Tennessee State Parks’ new traveling anniversary exhibit, which hit the road this year to tour state parks and various communities – sharing Tennessee State Parks’ rich and storied history. Enclosed in a colorful trailer emblazoned with various images and logos, the exhibit interprets the origins and heritage of Tennessee’s state park system.

The Tennessee State Parks system was established through legislation in 1937, and those laws – with modifications and additions over the years – remain the framework for park operations today.  As in most states, Tennessee began in cooperation with federal programs that instigated individual parks. Later, Depression era recovery programs gave a boost to the idea and the possibility of creating parks. The Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration worked on land conservation, but also delved further into the actual planning and construction of what would become the first of 54 Tennessee State Parks.

Today, there is a state park within an hour’s drive of just about anywhere in Tennessee.  A 2009 University of Tennessee study highlights the positive economic impacts that state parks provide local communities, particularly in rural areas of the state.  The study found that for every dollar spent on trips to Tennessee State Parks, an additional $1.11 of economic activity was generated throughout the state.  When the direct and indirect expenditures were combined, the impact of Tennessee State Parks to the state’s economy was $1.5 billion in total industry output, supporting more than 18,600 jobs.

“Our vision statement highlights the inherent value of our natural environment, along with the value of the many physical reminders of Tennessee’s past,” said Deputy Commissioner Brock Hill. “Tennessee’s state parks have played such an important role in our history, and they play a critical role in our health and quality of life, which will benefit Tennesseans well into the future.”

Tennessee’s state parks deliver a rich fabric of natural landscapes, wild places, preserved ecologies, outdoor recreational opportunities and protected historic scenes and resources – together representing the heritage of Tennessee in the landscape.

Tennessee's 54 state parks and 82 state natural areas offer diverse natural, recreational and cultural experiences for individuals, families or business and professional groups.  State park features range from pristine natural areas to 18-hole championship golf courses.  For a free brochure about Tennessee State Parks, call toll free at 888 867-2757. For upcoming events in connection with the 75th Anniversary of Tennessee State Parks, please visit the state parks website at www.tnstateparks.com.

In commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of Tennessee State Parks, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation launched an innovative new microsite at www.tnstateparks75.com. Established in partnership with the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development, the microsite displays Tennessee State Parks’ rich heritage and showcases the many outdoor adventures awaiting state park visitors through rich media and dynamic content.

Harrison Bay State Park covers 1,200 acres, with approximately 40 miles of Chickamauga Lake shoreline. Harrison Bay was originally developed as a Tennessee Valley Authority recreation demonstration area in the 1930s. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was responsible for the initial construction of Harrison Bay State Park and it was the first park owned by the state of Tennessee. This beautiful wooded park is a haven for campers, boaters and fishermen, as well as picnickers and other day-use visitors from Chattanooga and the surrounding area.



The River Maze In Ocoee Returns For 13th Season

“Over the River and Thru the Woods” is the new, challenging design for the corn maze and “To Grandmother’s House We Go” is the theme of the soybean maze at Birch Land Ocoee Farms (home of The River Maze).  Miles of trails have intricately been carved into a corn field and a soybean field on the banks of the Ocoee River. The corn maze this year is a tribute to Grandma.  Guests ... (click for more)

Tennessee Aquarium Researchers Create First Map Of North America’s Turtle Communities

When it comes to conserving a species, scientists first must know two things: Where they live and why they reside there. A first-of-its-kind study conducted by Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute scientists Dr. Josh Ennen and Sarah Sweat seeks to answer these fundamental questions regarding North America’s many turtle species. The ground-breaking report was published in ... (click for more)

Firefighters Battle 2-Alarm Apartment Building Fire

More than a dozen people were forced from their homes early Thursday morning when fire broke out in their apartment building.   The Chattanooga Fire Department received the alarm at  2:58 a.m.  and responded to Rainbow Creek Apartments at  7604 Standifer Gap Road  with six fire companies. Seeing a significant amount of fire upon arrival, a ... (click for more)

Lone Survivor Of Lookout Valley Massacre Says He Is 100% Sure Morse Was One Of Shooters; Detective Tells Of Retrieving Guns

The lone survivor of a massacre at a Lookout Valley trailer park on April 9, 2014, testified Wednesday that he is 100 percent sure that Derek Morse was one of the two shooters. Matthew Callam said he was thrown off initially by the fact that Morse had facial hair at the time, but he said when he was shown a recent photo of Morse soon after the incident "it was like I was looking ... (click for more)

Why The Ed Johnson Memorial Matters To Me, A Libertarian

I have seen a lot of responses to the question of whether or not our city and county should financially support the Ed Johnson Memorial at the Walnut Street bridge. Some fully support government pitching in and some say that private individuals and civic organizations should pitch in. Both are correct.  Our city has become a very sought after place to live. From our hometown ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: McQueen & Her TVAAS

If I am reading my Ouija Board right, I suspect the Hamilton County School Board will vote to allow a controversial “partnership” to be formed with the state Board of Education tonight at its monthly meeting. State Education Commissioner Candice McQueen has said she will demand the one-sided partnership to take over the operation of five at-risk schools in Hamilton County and, if ... (click for more)