Criminal, Civil Collections Up For Eastern District Of Federal Court

Monday, December 10, 2012
Total collections by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Eastern District of Tennessee for the past three years have been more than two and one-half times its total appropriated operating budgets for Fiscal Years (FY) 2010, 2011 and 2012. 
 
In FY2012, $24,837,866.29, was collected in criminal and civil actions.  Of this amount, $2,287,640.79 was collected in criminal actions and $22,550,225.50 was collected in civil actions.
 
Additionally, the office collected $7,156,513.00 in criminal and civil forfeitures.
 
Nationwide, $13.1 billion was collected in criminal and civil actions during FY 2012, more than doubling the $6.5 billion collected in FY 2011.  The $13.1 billion represents more than six times the appropriated budget of the combined 94 offices for FY 2012.  The $13.16 billion collected nationwide by the U.S. Attorneys’ offices for FY 2012 nearly matches the $13.18 billion collected in FY 2010 and FY 2011 combined.
 
“During this time of economic recovery, these collections are more important than ever,” said U.S. Attorney Killian. “The U.S. Attorney’s Office is dedicated to protecting the public and recovering funds for the federal treasury and for victims of federal crime.  We will continue to hold accountable those who seek to profit from their illegal activities.”
 
For further information, the United States Attorneys’ Annual Statistical Reports can be found on the internet at http://www.justice.gov/usao/reading_room/foiamanuals.html

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