State Library and Archives Continues Thanksgiving Weekend Tradition

Monday, November 19, 2012
 
Everyone has had their fill of turkey. No one can bear the thought of another trip to the mall. So what else is there for a family to do on a Thanksgiving weekend?

If you’re in the Nashville area Saturday, you may want to visit the Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA) for its second annual ‘Family History Day.’ During the event, State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill and TSLA’s expert research staff will give people tips on how to get started in genealogy research so they can learn more about the ancestral bonds they share with the people who were sitting across the Thanksgiving dinner table from them.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be held from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Saturday at the TSLA building, 403 Seventh Avenue North, just west of the State Capitol in downtown Nashville. Sherrill will conduct a workshop on family research from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. in TSLA’s auditorium.

“I encourage families to participate in this great holiday weekend event,” Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. “Thanksgiving is a time when we celebrate our nation’s history. This event allows people to focus on their personal histories as well. Participants who spend a day at this workshop may end up developing a hobby that lasts for a lifetime. As our staff at TSLA will tell you, genealogical research can be very addictive. And it’s a lot healthier than an extra serving of dressing.”

Sherrill and his staff will outline how family records, oral history, courthouse filings, library sources, web sites and other materials can be used to trace a person’s roots and organize the information that’s collected through research. Attendees are encouraged to bring any notes and information they have already collected about their families.

Sherrill has 30 years of experience as a librarian, archivist and genealogist. He is the author of more than 20 books on various topics of historical interest. He was appointed to his post in 2010.

Because seating is limited, reservations for the workshop are required. To reserve a spot, call (615) 741-2764 or e-mail shop.tsla@tn.gov

Parking is available around the TSLA building.


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