County Mayor Coppinger Kicks Off Courthouse Centennial Celebration

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Hamilton County Mayor Jim Coppinger held a press conference Thursday afternoon to kick off the year-long celebration for 100th anniversary of the Hamilton County Courthouse.     

County Mayor Coppinger said, “The exhibit we’re opening today features photos and facts surrounding Hamilton County’s rich history, with a special focus on the county’s early years. Many of these photos have never been released before. We hope that this exhibit will provoke others in the community to share their interesting historical photos.”   The exhibit will remain open to the public in the courthouse rotunda until November 2013.

County Mayor Coppinger said, “Many people don’t realize that the county seat has not always been in the City of Chattanooga. It started in Soddy Daisy, then moved to Hixson, then to Harrison and finally to Chattanooga after the Civil War. This exhibit is a compilation of photographs and information from the Chattanooga - Hamilton County Bicentennial Library, the Chattanooga History Center, and former county historians, John Wilson and James Livingood. I’d like to give special thanks to Constance Jones for loaning photographs from the Stokes Family Collection.”  

County Mayor Coppinger also announced plans for a Christmas Open House and concert next month, and an Independence Day Concert on the Courthouse lawn next summer.  


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