Third Gallery Talk at History Center November 13

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

The Chattanooga History Center will present the third session in its series of programs previewing the exhibit galleries which will be in its new facility on the Tennessee Aquarium Plaza.   The Third Gallery Talk: The Drum Is Beating and I Must Go  will be held in the History Center's meeting room at 7:00pm on Tuesday, November 13th.  The fee is $5 per person (CHC members free).  Space is limited and pre-registration is required.

  The deadline is Monday, November 12th. For more information, or to register, call 423-265-3247.  

CHC Executive Director and Historian, Dr. Daryl Black, will lead this examination of the third gallery visitors will encounter as they move through the new exhibit space.  In addition to discussing the historical story, participants will learn the reasons specific artifacts were chosen for exhibit in this gallery and will examine some of the artifacts themselves.  If construction activity permits, they will also visit the space the gallery will occupy in the new facility to help them understand how it relates to the whole. 

In the weeks after Abraham Lincoln was elected president, ten states left the Union.  But, in Tennessee, loyalties were divided.  Where slaveholders held the majority, secession was favored.  In East Tennessee, where slaveholders were few, Union Loyalty was common, though not solid.  Through the railroad, the area had business ties to the deep south.  In Chattanooga, the divisions followed a pattern that appeared across East Tennessee.  In rural areas, the majority of small farmers favored the Union, but in towns, sympathies leaned toward the Confederacy.  The Drum Is Beating and I Must Go tells the story of the divided community, Tennessee secession, and Chattanooga's pivotal role in the Civil War.


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